Get Out is the Second Highest Grossing R-Rated Horror Film of All Time

Get Out, Jordan Peele’s  directorial debut, had some choice words for Ridley Scott’s 2001 film, Hannibal over the weekend: “Get Out of the #2 spot!”

For the past 16 years, no R-rated horror film has been able to exceed Hannibal‘s domestic total gross of $165, 092,268. Made on a production budget of $87 million, the film debuted to a rabid worldwide audience who were eager to see more of Anthony Hopkins in his iconic titular role. The film easily hit the #2 all time domestic slot for R-rated horror films, second only to the 1973 classic, The Exorcist (which has a domestic lifetime gross of $232,906,145).

Now, with little name recognition and no franchise recognition in the marketplace, Get Out has become an R-rated “little engine that could”! With a minuscule budget of just $4.5 million, Peele’s film has just bumped Hannibal from its longtime position on the charts. Get Out‘s current domestic total stands at $167,912,725 as of this writing.

This is good news for everyone (except for Hannibal Lecter!) Not only is Get Out yet another reminder to studios that good R-rated movies can indeed make money at the box office; it also shows that original ideas and diverse perspectives are a welcome addition to horror offerings at the cinema. One of the things that makes the film so refreshing for viewers  is the fact that it is so different from all of the cookie cutter horror films the big studios usually deliver to theaters.

Get Out is at the end of it’s theatrical run, so its domestic total won’t reach much higher than where it currently sits. Regardless, given the lack of movement at the top of the chart between 1973 and 2017, it will likely sit in the #2 spot for a very long time unless Hollywood learns from its performance and starts taking more chances.

Stay tuned to Horror News Network for more information on Get Out and the highest grossing horror films of all time as it breaks!

John Evans
Staff Writer at Horror News Network
John has loved movie monsters for as far back as he can remember. He's since collected up as many comics, statues, and autographed material related to movies and music that he can get his hands on. He is particularly interested in the critical and analytical discussion of the best stories the horror genre has to offer. One of his largest works on the topic is a study on the portrayals of people with disabilities in horror films.
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